Florida Voice Times

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While many Americans are still recovering from the three major hurricanes that hit U.S. soil in 2017, including Harvey, Maria and Irma, Colorado State University issued its first forecast for the 2018 Atlantic Hurricane Season on Thursday and it doesn't look great.

With a little less than two months until hurricane season begins in June, forecasters from CSU predict that 2018 will be another above-average season, with 14 named storms, seven hurricanes and three major hurricanes.

However, while these numbers are still above the 30-year average of 12 named storms, six hurricanes and two major hurricanes, it is not as severe as the forecasts for 2017’s hurricane season, which predicted between 14-19 named storms, 5-9 hurricanes and 2-5 major hurricanes.

With names like Alberto, Helene, Leslie and William, these storms have a 63 percent probability of producing at least one major hurricane that makes landfall in the United States this year, according to CSU.

 


 

 

2018's Hurricane Season Will Be More Active Than Usual018's Hurricane Season Will Be More Active Than Usual

 

2018 Storm Names

 

Alberto

Beryl

Chris

Debby

Ernesto Florence Gordon

Helen

Isaac

Joyce

Kirk 
 

 

 

Leslie

Michael Nadine

Oscar

Patty

Rafael

Sara

Tony

Valerie

William



•Know your hurricane risk. Talk to your local emergency management agency.
•Make an emergency plan.
•Build or restock your basic disaster supplies kit, including food and water, a flashlight, batteries, chargers, cash, and first aid supplies.
•Consider buying flood insurance.
•Familiarize yourself with local emergency plans. Know where to go and how to get there should you need to get to higher ground or to evacuate.
•Stay tuned to local wireless emergency alerts, TV, or radio for weather updates, emergency instructions, or evacuation orders.


Know where to go. If you are ordered to evacuate, know the local hurricane evacuation route(s) to take and have a plan for where you can stay. Contact your local emergency management agency for more information.
Put together a disaster supply kit, including a flashlight, batteries, cash, first aid supplies, and copies of your critical information if you need to evacuate
If you are not in an area that is advised to evacuate and you decide to stay in your home, plan for adequate supplies in case you lose power and water for several days and you are not able to leave due to flooding or blocked roads.
Make a family emergency communication plan.
Many communities have text or email alerting systems for emergency notifications.To find out what alerts are available in your area, search the Internet with your town, city, or county name analerts.d the word “

 

When there is no hurricane: Make a hurricane plan

Basic Preparedness Tips

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